A most usual title for my blog but I will try to explain.

We recently returned from New Orleans where we were fortunate to tour the relatively new World War II Museum. It is located just a short walk from Canal Street and the French Quarter. The Museum consists of several buildings, was financed by private funds and has quickly become one of the most visited museums in the U.S. As a history fan, I willingly signed up for our group’s tour but I was totally blown away by the experience. We walked through interactive, multi media rooms that traced the war in Europe and then the war in the Pacific. We ate lunch in their Canteen hall listening to three women singing both popular and patriotic songs from the forties. We ended our tour by watching a large screen movie narrated by Tom Hanks titled Beyond All Boundaries. Here are some of the takeaways.

Geography involved: Germany and Italy conquered most of Europe and Northern Africa. Japan conquered most of the Pacific Rim including the coastline of China and all the islands just north of Australia and New Zealand. This really was a world war versus the regional conflicts of more recent history.  The color maps at the Museum are amazing.

Casualties: 65 million people, military and civilian, died in this war. The most casualties were our allies, at the time, Russia and China with well over 10 million each. Germany and Japan, mostly from bombing by the U.S. and our allies, lost about 10 million in total. But beyond human deaths, entire towns and countries where destroyed.

Race: Both Germany and Japan believed that they were a superior race to those they fought. Japan’s Emperor was considered God. Germany not only executed Jews but also a number of other ethnic groups. The U.S. locked our own West Coast Japanese citizens in interment camps or allowed the young men to fight, often heroically in Europe. Our African-American troops were segregated and fought with honor when given the opportunity, such as the famed Tuskegee Airmen. Wars are fought for many reasons, such as economic gain,  but race or religion are often used to motivate people to this day.

Patriotism: In every exhibit you learn remarkable stories of the men and women who participated in the war. Women, like my mother who was a WAC, trained men and flew planes and supplies to our troops. In Europe, the Battle of the Bulge was Germany’s last major offensive campaign that almost worked. In the Pacific, critical island battles like Midway and Iwo Jima turned the tide for the U.S. and its allies. Heroes emerged everywhere.

But maybe the most fascinating thing happened at our lunch in the Museum Canteen. There three young ladies sang the Star Spangled Banner, America the Beautiful and each of the military services theme songs. EVERYONE stood up the whole time and applauded.

In conclusion, a couple thoughts. Go to New Orleans and see the WWII Museum. Take your kids and grandkids from high school age on. And, to quote several of my friends on the tour, if you know any NFL football players, encourage them to go as well!

 

 

 

One of the business blogs I follow is the Leadership Freak by Dan Rockwell. Dan had a post about the importance for Leaders and Managers to learn to say No. He cites the fact that saying Yes is much more popular in corporate America, as it tends to please people, while showing a willingness to try new things, etc. But No can be equally powerful.

So this got me to thinking about my own career and the power of Yes and No.

When I was a young, senior financial person at the private firm, Donn, I worked  with many older, operating people and the firm’s owner and his family. I found myself almost always saying Yes to try to please or impress these important peers or superiors. Of this group, one of the most famous and demanding was Branco, Donn’s European President. In my book, The Business Zoo, I tell a story about how skilled and smooth Branco was at getting his way. That story illustrates that Branco was a Grand Master at wining and dining, which was his preferred way to get things done.

After a while, Branco and I became friends and although he was always insistent on getting his own way, at times he gave me some advice. One day he told me that my problem is I cannot say No to anyone! An ironic comment from him, but very true.

I started to look at the world in a much healthier and useful light. I learned that there were times that, for the company or my own mental or moral well-being, I had to say No. But most importantly I learned how to say No without getting people upset, perhaps by suggesting an acceptable (to me) alternative approach. That made me a much better manager and leader. The Yes and No’s need to be in a balance that works for you.

And Branco? Sadly, after he retired he asked me for something and I said No. After that he quit talking to me. Branco will return in a story or two in my second book. Stay tuned!

The Wall Street Journal had an article called “AT&T to Keep Time Warner’s Culture.” This refers to the proposed acquisition of the media firm by the  telecommunications firm. The deal is currently being challenged by the Justice Department. The article goes on to quote the CEO of AT&T saying he is “not a media tycoon” and he does not want to “screw it (Time Warner’s culture) up” by bringing them “a telephone company culture”.

Then the Journal had an interview with Amazon’s second in command, Jeff Wilke. In talking about their recent acquisition of Whole Foods, he said that Amazon “works hard to respect cultures that have been successful,” but that perhaps they can “help” Whole Foods with “resources, ideas and maybe IT services that Amazon has.”

This all sounds very smart and maybe even noble, but sadly, it will probably not play out this way for one or both companies. The larger, acquiring firm almost always screws up the leadership and culture of the smaller firm they spent a lot of money to buy. AT&T has offered $85 billion for Time Warner; Whole Foods cost Amazon $14 billion.

In most acquisitions, within three years two-thirds of the senior management of the acquired firm are gone. The Chairmen/CEOs go first, sometimes immediately with a huge payout for their stock and retention bonus (often equal to three years total pay.)   Sometimes they hang around a couple years to collect an additional bonus. But Chairmen/CEOs go fast followed by their key reports. With these people goes some of the knowledge and value that the acquiring firm paid for. And after the senior leaders are gone, the culture of the company starts to fade away as well. Leadership and Culture are, after all, the flip side of each other.

Why do smart companies willingly or sometimes subconsciously change the successful culture and leadership of the firms they spend a fortune to buy?

First, the acquiring firm, by definition, is the winner in the deal. Thus, they believe that their systems, procedures, people and business strategies are far superior to the firm they just acquired. When the accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers took over the legendary consulting firm Booz, the PWC people felt they were in charge, regardless of the rich 100 year history of Booz.

Second, the acquiring firms have lots of staff that are dying to “help” the firm they just took over. From Information Technology to accounting to Human Resources to legal, etc. etc., there are plenty of people who just want to “help.” The building material firm, USG Corporation, acquired my old Donn Corporation which was one tenth its size. USG setup 24 committees to “help” integrate Donn into USG. Donn was a loosely structured, oral culture company with few charts and procedures. USG was much the opposite. A few years later only three of the top dozen Donn leaders remained.

Third, strategies and circumstances change rapidly in business. An old friend said that large firms can change core businesses and strategies faster than people change their underwear. Honeywell just announced that they will spin off two large business groups with $7 billion of sales, so that they can focus more on their core businesses, the remaining $30 billion. Ironically, the original Honeywell business, thermostats, will be spun off with a number of businesses that were acquired in more recent years.

In closing, having been both an acquirer and one who was acquired, I would like to wish the Time Warner and Whole Foods leaders and their culture the best of luck! Things will never really be the same. It will help if you keep in mind that your firm sold and those other guys bought. There are winners and losers in deals just like in everything.

 

The unusual title of this blog post is from a new book called The Chickenshit Club by Jesse Eisinger. The book’s subtitled is “Why the Justice Department Fails to Prosecutes Executives.”  The writer cites several reasons why this is happening.  First, U.S. Attorneys are concerned about their conviction record and shy away from tough corporate cases they could lose, thus the nickname chickenshit. The second reason is even worse. The belief is that a far too cozy of a relationship exists between the government attorneys and the white collar defense lawyers who defend the corporate executives. The issue is that many government attorneys end up working, for far higher salaries later in their careers,  for the very laws firms they have been fighting against.

I have written before that corporate Boards of Directors and senior management are reluctant or afraid to prosecute fellow executives who commit crimes.This is true whether it is internal fraud, breaking security laws or even violating the firm’s ethics or morality code such as with sexual harassment.   Firms are reluctant because it often involves going after one of their own. Firms are afraid because to bring criminal charges because they have to follow through and maybe even testify in court!

So, when you combine the U.S. Government’s unwillingness to charge and try corporate executives and the corporations own reluctance to even report issues to the authorities, what do we have? To paraphrase James Bond, it is a license to steal and commitment securities fraud!

I Hate fraud and especially Management Fraud by those who get paid a lot already. So what is to be done? The federal government is hard to change as we all know. But, if these issues become more known they could end up being debated in law schools and maybe the next group of U.S. Attorneys will handle themselves and their responsibilities better. The corporate problem gets back to another one of my pet peeves, corporate boards.  Board of Directors have to step up and show courage and leadership in properly discipling and prosecuting executives who behave badly. None of this is easy but the present lax attitude to corporate misdoing needs to change.

To paraphrase the Nike logo, Just Do the Right Thing! People’s view of business and government may actually improve.

 

Over the years, I have often been asked by younger people starting out, what second language should I learn? A great question and one to which I have discovered the correct answer can change over time.

When I was younger and working with Donn Corporation, we had international  businesses in the United Kingdom, France, Germany and Scandinavia. Since I was traveling several times a year to these locations, I really wanted to learn a second language. As I have often done when facing a new decision, I thought I would ask the experts what they thought. We had a French President, Chris and a German President Branco. On my next trip to Europe I had the following conversations:

Brad to French guy Chris: Should I learn French or German?

French guy Chris to Brad: Learn German because you can not trust the Germans!

Brad to German guy Branco: Should I learn French or German?

German guy Branco to Brad: Learn French because you can not trust the French!

Now I had created a Real problem. I safely chose Not to learn either language.

In the last two years we have travelled to Switzerland and to Paris and Brussels. The Swiss all speak 5 or 6 languages and excellent English. This year in Paris and Brussels we noted that almost everyone we came in contact with willingly and smoothly spoke English. This was not always the case, especially in Paris, but it is today.

Why do even the reluctant French speak so much English? It is not because they love Americans and certainly not the British all of a sudden. Rather it is because wherever we travelled in Europe we ran into huge groups of tourists from Asia especially China. And how do all these Asian visitors communicate in Europe? In English, of course.

Which leads me back to the question of learning a second language. Americans are lucky and blessed that English has become the international language of both business and leisure. But if a young American asked me today what language should they learn, my answer would be Mandarin, the most spoken of the several Chinese languages.  In the retail and hospitality businesses,  a young person who speaks Mandarin can get a job wherever they want to.

But there is another correct answer to this second language question. Young people around the globe should learn the language of Coding. Coding is what allows us to create and use computer software, use apps on your mobile devices, engage in social media sites like Facebook and to explore the web and visit websites. Technology is the future and Coding is the key to technology.

So that is my final answer, lock it in, learn Coding!

Not many firms have had the continued bad press as Uber has over the past couple years. Sued on their business and employment practices and then on their self-driving car technology. Employees filing numerous sexual harassment and discrimination suits. Now the private Board throws out the Founder and CEO, Travis Kalanick. Mr. Kalanick is a self-described bad boy who admitted before his firing that he needed help managing the company. He is also the person most people believe created and encouraged the firm’s toxic culture.

Uber has fired some twenty managers and brought a couple female executives on board. But all of these measures may be too little and too late.  So what is Uber to do?

Leadership and Culture are the flip side of each other. What Uber needs is not only a new CEO but a new senior management team. Uber should also replace most of the Board, especially the long time Directors.  Mr. Kalanick is no longer CEO but he was allowed to remain on the Board, which is another mistake. Why? Because it will take a new CEO, senior team and Board to create a new corporate culture. This is not an easy or a quick thing to do. Leadership starts at the top and that is the Board. If the existing Board could not figure out the many legal problems and ethical missteps that Mr. Kalanick and his team were subjecting the firm to, they need to be replaced. Actions speak much louder than words. And major cultural change, in this and most cases, must start at the top. The Board is who everyone in a company look to for guidance.

Uber is often cited as an example of industry disruption as taxi cabs are disappearing. But Uber has other capable competitors like Lyft. These competitors may find a way to gain an advantage while Uber tries to rebuild both its Leadership and Culture. We will see if Uber can truly change and survive.

Two recent articles in the Wall Street Journal raised some new thoughts about Boards of Directors. This, often little understood group, technically manage the biggest public companies. I have written before on the lack of attention and professionalism of some corporate directors and I keep hoping this governance area will improve! Here are a couple ideas that might help.

One article dealt with the growing trend of large investors, like hedge or private equity funds, who buy a block of a firm’s stock and then trying to force the company to elect a number of their nominees as directors. On the surface the concept sounds good and a way to shake up underperforming  firms. But here is the catch. The people nominated by the outside investor are not subject to any review or disclosure of their positions on critical matters that might impact the target firm. They are just listed as part of the slate of directors that the investor wants. So the shareholders who are asked to vote for the new directors do so with very little useful information. The Journal article suggests that these nominated directors appear at public forums with independent moderators or even some of the current directors to debate views. To make this work the very large institutional equity owners like Fidelity or the California Pension funds would have to insist on this additional step before voting. I really like this idea!

The second article rethought the current trend of having only one corporate officer like the CEO on the Board with all outside independent directors. The concerns here are twofold.  First, in large and diverse businesses the entire board might benefit from more internal knowledge especially during a crisis or new initiative. For example if the firm is about to launch a huge capital or technology project, another corporate officer on the Board might add a lot.  Second, if the Board has only one insider and something happens to that person-health or an unexpected dismissal- the other outside directors may be at a loss as to name their replacement. So the thought is on a board of 10-12 directors having 2 or 3 inside officers might be best. Again this seems like a worthwhile idea.

So as I have said before, the buck stops with the Board of Directors. All the officers report to them and the Board represents the mass of shareholders. The more knowledge shareholders have about directors the better and the more directors know and are comfortable with the senior officer group the better as well.

Linkedin just had an article about the best places to work today. The usual suspects are listed: Google,  Facebook and Amazon and some newer, and surprising  ones to me,  Uber (lots of bad press and legal issues)  and Tesla (who makes no profits and may run out of money, not gas.)

But was really struck me was how few of the top companies even existed 25 let alone 10 years ago! The ones that remain have changed a lot: Time Warner (magazines to cable), JPMorgan (a dozen mergers later started as Chemical Bank) and Disney which looks like it may be around forever and never age like Mickey Mouse!

Fortune magazine had an article that stated that 88% of their 500 largest firms from the 1950’s are gone and predicted that 40% of today’s largest firms will be gone in 10 years.

Since I constantly advise graduates and young people where to work, this got me thinking. People used to get a job right out of college and then retire there 40 years later with a good pension. None of this is true today for millennials.

In my book, I stressed that as one moves up in their careers, they needed to study beforehand the leadership and culture of the next company they wanted to work for to try to gauge their personal fit and thus improve the chance to succeed. Now I believe that even graduates and young working people need to do this plus reading all they can about their targeted potential employer. What is their overall strategy, how sophisticated are they on technology and social media, are they well financed? And is their own business model sustainable or will they be the next industry subject to what we increasingly call disruptive innovation, like Uber to taxicabs?

Even though young graduates may work for a half dozen or more organizations in their career, they need to try to look down the road to try to figure out if their next employer will even be around! I believe this new group of millennials are better equipped and more comfortable, than my generation ever was, to research and analyze all the available, on-line information that now.  After all it is their future world. This may also be one of those few areas where most well meaning parents are just not able to help. Looking for your first job or your next job has always been difficult and in this rapidly changing world it just got harder!

USA Today had an article about the world’s largest hotel company, Marriott, using factory produced modular construction to build up to 50  of their hundreds of new hotels this year.  The guest room and/or the bathrooms are produced in a factory on a production line and then transported to the prepared construction site where they are erected by cranes. The plumbing, electrical and finish work then occurs. The theory is that this method of construction can reduce the time it takes to build a new hotel by several months. Thus, the hotel opens sooner and can make a higher return for its owners.

Is this new, you might ask? No, like most things in this world it is not new. In my book, The Business Zoo, I tell a similar story that occurred forty years ago. My old company, Donn, signed a deal to build one of the first modular hotels for the world’s largest hotel company, Holiday Inn. Our U.S. government even got involved to promote low cost housing  through the new department of Housing and Urban Development which was headed by a George Romney, father of, you guessed it, Mitt. The belief was that factory produced,  modular construction would revolutionize and change conventional, on-site construction forever.

What happened to this bold experiment those many years ago? It did not turn out so great. The timetable took just as long as conventional construction. The idea of just hooking these up on the site was a disaster with a lot of additional work required. And my old firm, Donn, lost several million dollars when that was a lot of money in general and specifically for a small, private business. The big company, Holiday Inn, did end up with a nice hotel, but having learned a few lessons, stayed away from modular construction. Modular construction never totally disappeared but it certainly did not replace or change the way hotels or apartments were built.

Will this new attempt be more successful? I am not sure. Construction  is one of our most localized industries. Local zoning and building codes vary by community and can offset some of the anticipated factory produced savings.  Construction is one of those businesses that are still highly unionized which can also impact costs and building codes.

What I do find fascinating is how sometimes business, like other things in life, goes around in a circle. Modular hotel construction in the 1970’s repeats four decades later. Sometimes the patterns and the results are similar and sometimes things change. The space shuttles of the 70’s now are replaced with Elon Musk’s rockets aiming for Mars but we really have not gone very far in space in all that time.

The famous writer George Santayana said, “those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”  Mark Twain said, “history doesn’t repeat itself but it does rhyme”.

I say,  there are a lot of Circles in both business and life so be careful out there!

The Wall Street Journal recently reported that my city of Chicago has the most tower construction cranes (56) in use anywhere in North America. This was a result of a survey by the Crane Index (Yes, there is such a thing. If there is a Duck Dynasty why not this!). But what is also interesting is that over half of those Chicago construction cranes are building residential apartments and specifically luxury residential apartments.

And just who are these luxury rental units aimed at? Millennials, of course. This trendy group of young adults, aged 18 to 34, have the lowest percentage of home ownership of any generation since these types of records have been kept. Why is that? Experts comment that the reasons include the high cost of homes, tighter credit rules and the fact that many Millennials still live at home. But an overriding reason seems to be that Millennials do not view owning a house as a required or good, social or financial investment. So they rent.

And what kind of luxuries do these luxury rentals offer Millennials? One of the newest places is called Wolf Point and is on the Chicago river. On the 46th top floor, is a sky deck and lounge, an outdoor kitchen, a fire pit, sauna and steam room, outdoor tv and a state of the art fitness center. On the main floor is a large pool, a river front lounge and gallery, golf simulator in the club room, a business center, a dog run and spa, and a bike room with a wash area and a workshop! I know what you are thinking 1. Why is he writing so much about this? (I will get to that) and 2. Where can I sign up!! Well there is a catch or two. Because the building offers you so much wonderful stuff there are trade offs. A one bedroom is 678 sq. ft. with two small closets and very small rooms and goes for $2,555/ month. But you won’t be spending any time in your small apartment, you will be having fun somewhere else in the wonderful building!

One of our friends is involved in the financing of these new high-end apartment buildings. He told me that those in his industry are getting increasingly worried. What if the Millennials decide to get married and have kids and move to the suburbs like earlier generations? Older, downsizing seniors will not find much about these units appealing since their favorite couch and king size bed will probably not fit. The result is a lot of empty luxury apartments!

So why did I write this blog? First, I find Millennials fascinating. There are more of them than my Boomer Generation and they are the future of our country, not us. Second, figuring out long lasting trends in critical areas such as housing is very important to our economy. But is this a true long term trend or just a short term passing fancy? Third, for those who know me and my background in construction, you know what comes next. Every time we have a boom in any type of construction-schools, offices, apartments- it is followed with a long bust. And because construction, building materials and related furnishings are such a large part of our economy it really worries me that Chicago has all those cranes right now because I know the sky will be free of them in a couple years as the construction cycle swings,  the economy slows and the stock market drops.

And lastly, my Boomer group owned homes well before age 30. If the Millennials do not start with a first home soon they will never get to the point in life where they will want a second home. Then what happens to all the weekend second homes in Michigan, Indiana and Wisconsin? And what about all the seasonal, second homes in Florida, Arizona and Vegas? The result is again a lot of empty and unsold second homes. Again bad for the economy.

Note to readers: We just sold our second home in Florida and not to a Millennial!