Archives for posts with tag: business

The Wall Street Journal just published a new article on this subject. A huge money manager, State Street announced it would vote against corporate Board members who are part of company’s nominating committee and do not add women to their Boards. State Street is also placing a statue of a young girl on Wall Street where she will stare at the famous Bull. (I did not make this up!)

In a review of the Russell 3000 index of companies, a quarter of firms have no female directors and over half of the firms have under 15% of women on their Boards.

In my book, The Business Zoo, I commented on what I called the One Third role of Board members. One third of Board members should not be on Boards at all due to lack of valuable background, age or being too busy on other Boards. The second One Third had the potential to be qualified and contribute but for a number of reasons did not; not reading the Board materials ahead or ever making a worthwhile comment. The final One Third led the Board and did a great job.

In my day we only had one or two women on a typical Board of 10 to 12. The women Directors were always in the best One Third category.  Why was this? Did they consider it an honor and a duty to service a firm which was paying them a lot of money? Were they younger and had much more energy and focus? Did they, as women, just work with other people better when given a chance? Of course all of these reasons are true. In fact, State Street’s research shows that in the last five years, Boards with at least three women Directors outperformed those companies with no women Directors. No surprise to me.

So how do we end up with more women on corporate Boards? I am not big on the statue. I do agree that voting pressure on companies and their Boards can help. Boards all have committees to nominate and elect new directors. Most of the committee members are men who nominate other men who they know. The existing women on Boards need to exert some pressure themselves and get on these nominating committees. Then not be shy about suggesting other women. And they can point to studies that show that Boards with more women directors can drive success and higher stock values!

Add on note: I really appreciate everyone who reads this blog and who bought my book on Amazon. I have received some wonderful feedback and am now starting on a second book!

Brad

A new movie is coming about the life of McDonald’s Founder, Ray Kroc who created late in life not only a major company but a whole new type of business.

The consulting firm Bain & Company has a study and a new book called The Founder’s Mentality. In their study, Bain points out that founder-led companies delivered three time higher returns to shareholders than other large public firms.

Bain cites three main traits that they believe help founder-led firms to perform so well. In a Wall Street Journal article they relate their work to McDonalds and Ray Kroc. Having worked in my formative years for Donn Corporations’s founder, Don Brown, I wanted to add some thoughts to this important topic.

The three traits that Bain describe that distinguish founder-led firms are:

1. Insurgency where the firm declares war on its industry. For McDonald’s that involved  a whole new way of delivering food with their fast service. At Donn, we had a sense of urgency in everything we did and a disregard for traditional corporate hierarchy or functions like Human Resources.

2. Obsession with how customers are treated. At McDonalds this occurred with watching every detail from the size of the burgers to what potatoes were used for their fries. At Donn we were the first to create customer incentive trips for our customers plus unlimited expense accounts to entertain them including a yacht and condo in the Bahamas!  I would add here that I think the best founder-led firms also treat their own employees in special ways as well. For a small firm, Donn had annual employee outings, turkeys at Thanksgiving and Christmas gifts for our employee children in every world-wide location.

3. Companies are steeped in the owner’s mindset. For Ray Kroc this meant setting up a next generation of founders in his unique franchise system. For Donn Corporation, Don Brown’s vision and values formed its culture and leadership style that caused the company to grew rapidly and prosper. Much of the culture was based on respect, trust and faith in each other. Thirty years after Donn was sold to USG Corporation over 125 former employees signed up for a potential reunion.

In my book, The Business Zoo, on Amazon the ending chapter is on Leadership and Culture. Ray Kroc built that at McDonalds as did Donn’s founder, Don Brown.

I wish all my readers of this blog or my book a wonderful Holiday Season and great 2017!

My wife, Tricia, and I are renovating an apartment in Chicago. Technically, Tricia is renovating it and she is very good at this. She is also experienced as this is our third such project in Chicago. Tricia has a true designer’s eye but she like things to be Perfect or close to it.

The construction industry, where I spent much of my working career, is not Perfect. It uses imperfect terms for aspects of construction like carpentry which can be Rough versus Finish. And every construction contract is usually subject to endless change orders which always seem to double the initial cost estimate you thought you were spending.             Not Perfect.

This got me thinking about some of the questions that young people often ask me about their jobs. Sometimes they struggle to gather all the data possible to make a decision. Sometimes they even miss a critical or strategic opportunity due to trying to make a Perfect decision.

My thoughts on this need for Perfection go along these lines:

-a passing grade in school is a 60%, an “A” usually is around 90%

-the CPA Exam is one of, if not, the hardest professional exam with over a 50% fail rate. Yet the average passing score for successful candidates is only about 75% today.

-in my own career, especially in the frequent financial crises my companies were in, if I knew 70 to 80% of the relevant facts, I felt very lucky and did not hesitate to make a decision. There is really no time to try to be Perfect in a crisis.

In this age of endless data, people feel pressure to try to gather and analyze all they can. But “data” and useful “information” are too very different matters. A recent story in the Wall Street Journal was about how the role of Chief Marketing person in retail has changed from someone with good, gut instincts to people who can crunch massive amounts of data. This has lead to the observation that many large, retail stores all look the same regardless of which chain. This may not make them more profitable, let alone Perfect.

To me, the need for timely decisions in our fast changing world takes precedence over the often mistaken need for Perfection in our often imperfect world. Sometimes experience and a gut feel with partial data is the best and fastest course of action.

This Blog draft had the least corrections ever from my proofreader and wife, Tricia. As close to Perfection as I am going to get!

A lot gets written about the importance for young people in business to work or live abroad for a period of time. Years ago, an international assignment was very unusual and not often a good career move due to the uncertainty of what job might be available when you returned to the U.S. Companies often had trouble reintegrating an expatriate or recognizing the increased value of their employee. This was especially true in large firms with rigid job categories and inflexible pay scales. Fortunately this is changing.

Nowadays many of the young professional I advise are looking forward to and planning on an international assignment. This is very possible in the consulting field but also workable in many businesses. The timing can vary but it is often in your late twenties or early thirties after you have made several moves and/or promotions in the domestic business. I always strongly urge these “clients” of mine to push internally to get an international assignment. The young people I know used to lean to Western Europe but now the focus is on Australia or Asia.

Why is this international experience so important? I wrote earlier in my blogs about developing  “an International frame of mind”. This is much easier for many young people outside the U.S. Other countries study English for years and young people long to visit and be educated in our country. We are still a very U.S. centric focused country. But this is changing. And it better change as we are truly a global marketplace.

I was personally fortunate to spend a lot of my earlier years with Donn Corporation working with our businesses outside the U.S. I was often in both Canada and Europe six times in year and every few years in Asia. Many of the experiences I write about in The Business Zoo relate directly to these international involvements and the great people I was fortunate to get to know. Here are a couple examples and stories from the book.

Dining with Europeans. These are some of the most sophisticated people in the world. They have made the art of dining  an essential and integral aspect of both business and life. Much can be learned by mastering their skills.

Learning the nuance of language and words. From Donn’s European Controllers I learned that the word Yes means different things depending on your country and its culture. To the French, Yes meant I heard you and I will consider (not always do) what you said. To the Germans, it meant Yes, I will follow it in great detail and they would then ask a dozen questions to clarify what i meant. The Asian countries bring their own unique cultures to this.

So if you work for an organization where you can get International work, go for it. If you work for an organization that does not have the kind of International involvements that you want , find another organization!

One of my favorite bosses, Tony, always said that most things in the world swing back and forth like a pendulum. In society and in business, we see this all the time. This is easy to see in commodities like corn or soybeans. We go from a shortage and high prices one year to everyone planting these same crops with a market glut and low prices resulting the next year. We love the free and easy flow of information on the Internet till we want to restrict it because it can invade our privacy or use our information for someone else’s commercial gain. Prices, regulations, even emotions, often swing like a pendulum.

With the start of a New Year and our economy generally improving, I wanted to talk about the Housing Pendulum which usually swings on a decade long cycle. I know you are thinking, wait a minute, we are barely out of our worst housing, construction downturn since the Great Depression! We can’t be getting into trouble again with Housing! Let’s look at a couple things going on right now.

Housing Prices. We were just in Naples, FL. for a visit. Remember in the early 2000s when resort and second home places like Florida, Las Vegas, and Arizona had prices jump 10-20% a year. And then they fell 50% or more a couple years later. In our downtown Naples area, the same condos went from under $1 million to $1.6 million. Then they fell to under $1 million after the 2007 Housing Bubble and stayed there for a few years. Now these condos that sold two years ago for $1.1 million and last year for $1.3 million are going for $1.5 million. And there is a growing shortage of inventory to buy. The City of Naples just issued the most tear down permits in its history as the old, small, outdated cottages are being replaced with new, trendier ones twice as big that fill up every inch of the lot or of two or three lots. The pricing on the new ones begin around $2 million. Is this just true of fancy resorts and second home places, you may be thinking?

My wife and I just listed and sold our downtown Chicago condo in ONE DAY and for the FULL price! Go figure. This is still less likely outside of retirement resorts but it is happening for the first time again.

Government Assistance to Housing.  A recent Wall Street Journal article talked about how the two government agencies that buy mortgages, Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, just issued new, relaxed mortgage standards. They will now allow as little as a 3% downpayment on a mortgage especially from low income people who have trouble coming up with a larger downpayment. These are the same two agencies that were partially blamed for the last housing crisis, for helping to bundle and sell high risk mortgages. And the same two agencies, that some in Congress and government suggested, should be disbanded. It is wonderful to want to help people struggling to buy a house and especially a first house. But the last time around, this group that struggled to buy a house with little of their own money, were the ones that defaulted or walked away from their mortgages. And it will happen again. And our government is helping.

So to some it may seem too early to worry about the Housing market tanking again. But to this old, long time building material guy, it seems like the Housing Pendulum is starting its swing. The last time it almost bankrupted Wall Street and our overall economy. Consider yourself warned!